DP WordPress Photo Challenge – Refraction

I love this challenge. I love light: the effect of light at various times of the day, at different points of the year. It changes here incredibly, on this island that sits north of the 50th parallel.

I call Winter, the ‘Dark Ages’. The sun’s light is weak, watery, and short-lived, lasting only about eight hours a day. The Winter of 2013/13 was no different, but we had snow in January.

Winter's touch, touched by winter's sun.
Winter’s touch, touched by winter’s sun.
Winter's Teeth
We’d had a fast freeze, rain to sub-zero. I love how you can see the path the water took.

 

To this Canuck, it was almost a relief. I never realised I would miss snow as much as I have, not to mention icicles.

The delicate and magical decoration of house eaves took on an extra special quality when confronted with the ivy on the house.

They actually lasted a couple of days before disappearing one warm Winter day.

Come Spring, snow is forgotten. Around the Vernal Equinox, as the sun’s angle shifts, the light changes incredibly. Having become increasingly stronger since early February, it now holds the skies for several hours longer.

 

 

 

 
It was late afternoon in early April and we stopped at a lane-side pub after a day spent exploring. The sun was nearing the horizon, cutting across the land to the window by which we sat.

It was early April and we stopped at a lane-side pub after a day spent exploring.
Golden brew in golden light.
Brilliant sun commands the sky and clouds.
Brilliant sun commands the sky and clouds.

By late April, the sun is much stronger than it had been in January. The world and sky have colour again.

This photo was taken at the same time of day as the last. The sun is higher, the angle a few degrees higher.

The trees, not having yet regained their plumage, reach for the warmth that will see them fully fledged within weeks.

By June, May Day having heralded the beginning of summer, the days are warm, the sun is at its strongest. The soft gold light of Spring is replaced by the the nourishing high light of Summer.

 

 

 

 

 
The sun’s presence is felt almost 19 hours a day by June. Glorious, long days allow for rambles in nature and help the wee ones to grow. The down on the Cygnets shimmers, helping to camouflage them until they are big enough to defend themselves.

The down on the Cygnets works with their colouring to help them blend with the water.
The down on the Cygnets works with their colouring to help them blend with the water.
Lavender flowers glow in early morning sun.
Lavender flowers glow in early morning sun.

 

But the Cygnets aren’t the only things the longer, brighter days encourage. This herb garden also is touched and encouraged by the sun’s strength.

The sun touched the sky at about 4:30. Now, about three hours later, it is warmer. Sunrise is fully over and the long day is begun.

The grace of the sun creates an amethyst and emerald aura.

By August, the days will be appreciably shorter. Autumn is coming, but the sun remains strong.

 

 

 

 

 

After the Autumnal Equinox, when the earth has shifted once more, early morning and late afternoon sun become rich and deep.

In mid-October, the leaves drip with light, the earth is bathed in it.
In mid-October, the leaves drip with light, the earth is bathed in it.

 

It's 7:30. The sun that created amethysts in June burnishes the world in October.
It’s 7:30. The sun that created amethysts in June burnishes the world in October.

As the earth continues her inexorable turn about the sun, the mood of the light follows suit, turning the morning drive to work into a treasure trove of light effects.

I love this light that only happens in Autumn. It’s rare, heart-touching in its loveliness.

Although I know this light is a harbinger of the Dark Ages to come, I look forward to it every year.

In a month, I will not see my world, my home in daylight except on weekends. I will leave before dawn and come home after sunset, but in Autumn the play of light can still delight me.

 

 

 

 

 

By the way, those Cygnets that in June had down to dazzle the light and make them appear nothing more than ripples in the water, in November are teenagers. Their down has become feathers, but still similar to the water in colour, taupe and white.

They're six months old now and their down is now plumage.
They’re six months old now and their down is now plumage.

I thought I would add this last photo because the changes in the Cygnets’ plumage are directly reflective of today’s challenge. Their down that captured the light and and made it dazzle, has been replaced by feathers that soak the light in. It’s as if they’re storing it so that in June, when they are fully grown and white, they will radiating light from within, just as their mother did six months ago.

For more reflections on refraction, go to: DP WordPress Photo Challenge – Refraction

 

 

 

3 thoughts on “DP WordPress Photo Challenge – Refraction

  1. I like the helpful info you provide in your articles. I’ll bookmark your blog and check again here regularly.
    I’m quite sure I will learn a lot of new stuff right here!

    Good luck for the next!

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